Comet Chasing in February


Comet chasing is the visual observation of telescopic comets.  Jump to:  Observing synopses    Summary data

News


There are two comets visible to the naked eye and three comets visible in small telescopes this month. Many more are visible in larger instruments.
  • C/2022 E3 (ZTF) passed perihelion in mid January 2023. On January 12 this comet passed within 0.3 AU of the earth. It was brightest, at magnitude 4.2, in late January, but will be observable in the evening in early February. This comet has been dubbed the "Green Comet" in the mass media, although that color isn't unusual for comets. This is actually a fainter comet, which only appears bright to us because it happened to pass close to the earth as it was closest to the sun. This is also the reason its tail geometry has been so complex and quickly changing. 

  • 96P/Machholz is a sun grazing comet with an orbital period of 5.3 years. It passed close to the sun on January 30, when it was best observed via solar monitoring satellites such as SOHO. By the time is is far away enough from the sun to detect in a telescope, in the second week of February,  it will be much fainter and difficult to detect in telescopes smaller than 10-inches.

  • C/2020 V2 (ZTF) will reach perihelion in early May 2023. It is predicted to reach maximum brightness of magnitude 9.5 in early September 2023.

  • C/2022 A2 (PANSTARRS) will pass perihelion in mid February. It is predicted to reach maximum brightness of magnitude 9.5 in late January. 

  • C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) passed perihelion in mid December 2022 and is fading. 

  • 81P/Wild passed perihelion in mid December and is fading. 

  • C/2019 L3 (ATLAS) is well past perihelion, which occurred in early January 2022. 

  • 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann passed perihelion on August 25. This comet has a long history of fragmentation, and some very faint fragments have been identified. 

  • C/2022 P1 (NEOWISE) passed perihelion in late November. It was reported to have brightned in late August and is currently predicted to reach maximum brightness of magnitude 13.3 in early November. It appears to be a periodic comet with a period of 94 years, leading to a previous perihelion in approximately 1928.

  • 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann has frequent outbursts, typically resulting in a brightening of 0.5 - 1.0 magnitudes, which occur roughly every 59 days, typically taking 5-10 days to subside. Up to three subsequent outbursts may occur 5-10 days afterward, each typically smaller than the last, although on some occasions they can be even brighter than the first. These outbursts make 29P one of the most interesting comets to follow, both visually and scientifically. 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann has a 14.8-year orbital period, and last passed perihelion in early March 2019. It varies in its distance from the Sun from 5.8 AU (at perihelion) to 6.3 AU (at aphelion), which is an unusually small variation for a comet, and remains quite far from the sun at all times. This means that it can be observed more or less continuously.

  • C/2014 UN271 (Bernardinelli-Bernstein) is an interesting Oort cloud comet that was reported as a result of the Dark Energy Survey. Soon after it was made public, images showed a cometary coma. Discovery credit goes to Pedro Bernardinelli and Gary Bernstein. This is a remarkable comet that was at 29 AU in 2014, with a perihelion of 10.9 AU in 2031. Its orbit extends out to 40,000 AU! It was unusually bright for its distance. Recent HST obsrvations that isolate the nucleus estimate the diamter to be between 120 and 140 km, making this possibly the largest comet nucleus yet measured. Because of its distant perihelion, this comet is not expected to become bright enough to be visually observed except in large instruments, and not until the end of the decade, but it is likely going to be the subject of intense scientific scrutiny. 

Comets that have apparently disentegrated: C/2021 P4 (ATLAS), C/2020 Q1 (Borisov), C/2020 P1 (NEOWISE), and C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS). Beware that various other sources often fail to keep track of whether or not a comet still exists!

Comet Visibility in the Eyepiece

This page uses code developed for SkyTools to predict the visibility of a comet in the eyepiece.  Predicting how much aperture is required to see a comet is a very complex task.  Have a look for yourself: a comparison of the predictions below (such as "visible in small telescopes") to the magnitude of each comet shows just how poor an indicator the magnitude alone really is. When you read below that a particular aperture is required to see a comet you can have a reasonable degree of confidence that the comet can in fact be seen in the eyepiece. But always remember, comets are like cats. They both have tails and do what they want, and not always what we expect. This is one of the things that makes comet chasing interesting!

Observing Synopses for February


Explanation of Comet Synopses and charts (read this if you have questions)

C/2022 E3 (ZTF): An evening comet visible in binoculars
This comet begins the month in Camelopardalis at magnitude 5.1. Look for a 16.5' coma. It should fade rapidly, moving into Taurus by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N High during evening twilight at ~18:30 High at ~19:30 High at ~19:30 Fairly high in moonlight at ~19:40 Not visible 1-
40o N High during evening twilight at ~18:40 High at ~19:20 High at ~19:20 High in moonlight at ~19:30 Not visible 1-
Equator Fairly high during evening twilight at ~19:20 High at ~19:40 High at ~19:40 High in moonlight at ~21:10 Not visible 1-
30o S Very low in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~20:20 High at ~20:20 Fairly high in moonlight at ~21:00 High during evening twilight at ~19:50 4-

C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS): A southern hemisphere evening comet visible in binoculars
This comet begins the month in Indus at magnitude 8.2. Look for a 4.5' coma. It should fade slowly, moving into Hydrus by month's end. The best visibility is late in the month as seen from the southern hemisphere.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
Equator Not visible Not visible Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Not visible 1-
30o S Fairly high in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~20:10 Fairly high in moonlight at ~20:10 Fairly high during evening twilight at ~19:50 1-

C/2022 A2 (PANSTARRS): A far-northern morning comet visible in small telescopes
This comet begins the month in Draco at magnitude 9.5. Look for a 4' coma. It should fade slowly, moving into Lacerta by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N High during morning twilight at ~05:50 Fairly high at ~19:00 Fairly high at ~05:10 Fairly high at ~05:00 Fairly high during morning twilight at ~04:50 1-
40o N Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:40 Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:30 Fairly high in the northern sky during morning twilight at ~05:20 Fairly high in the northern sky during morning twilight at ~05:10 Fairly high in the northern sky during morning twilight at ~05:10 1-
Equator Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
30o S Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  

C/2020 V2 (ZTF): A northern hemisphere evening comet visible in small telescopes
This comet begins the month in Cassiopeia at magnitude 9.9. Look for a 2' coma. It should fade slowly, moving into Andromeda by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N High during evening twilight at ~18:30 High at ~19:10 High at ~19:20 High in moonlight at ~19:30 High during evening twilight at ~19:30 1-
40o N High during evening twilight at ~18:40 High at ~19:10 High at ~19:10 High in moonlight at ~19:20 High during evening twilight at ~19:20 1-
Equator Fairly high in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Fairly high in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~19:30 Fairly high in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Fairly high in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 1-
30o S Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  

C/2019 L3 (ATLAS): A morning comet visible in small telescopes
This comet begins the month in Antlia at magnitude 11.5. Look for a 1' coma. It should fade slowly, moving into Pyxis by month's end. The best visibility is early in the month as seen from the southern hemisphere.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Low in the southern sky in moonlight at ~00:40 Low in the southern sky at ~23:50 Low in the southern sky at ~23:30 Low in the southern sky at ~23:00 Not visible 1-
Equator Fairly high in the western sky in moonlight at ~04:30 High at ~22:40 High at ~23:30 High at ~23:00 High in moonlight at ~20:10 1-
30o S High during morning twilight at ~04:20 High at ~22:20 High at ~23:30 High at ~23:00 Fairly high in the western sky at ~03:20 1-

29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann: An evening comet visible in a 6-inch (15 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Auriga at magnitude 11.4. Look for a 2' coma. It should fade slowly.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible High at ~20:50 High at ~20:20 High in moonlight at ~21:10 Not visible 1-
40o N Not visible High at ~20:50 High at ~20:20 High in moonlight at ~23:00 Not visible 1-
Equator High during evening twilight at ~19:10 High at ~20:50 High at ~20:20 High at ~22:20 Not visible 1-
30o S Fairly high in the northern sky during evening twilight at ~20:10 Fairly high at ~20:50 Fairly high at ~20:30 Fairly high in moonlight at ~20:30 Fairly high during evening twilight at ~19:40 1-

81P/Wild: A morning comet visible in an 8-inch (20 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Libra at magnitude 11.8. Look for a 1.5' coma. It should fade slowly, moving into Ophiuchus by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Low in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:50 Low in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:40 Low in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:20 Low in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 Not visible 1-
40o N Fairly high in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:40 Fairly high in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:30 Fairly high in the southern sky at ~05:20 Fairly high in the southern sky at ~05:10 Fairly high in the southern sky during morning twilight at ~05:10 1-
Equator High during morning twilight at ~05:10 High in moonlight at ~05:00 High at ~05:00 High at ~04:50 High at ~04:50 1-
30o S High during morning twilight at ~04:20 High in moonlight at ~04:10 High at ~04:10 High at ~04:20 High at ~04:30 1-

96P/Machholz: A morning comet visible in a 10-inch (25 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Aquarius at magnitude 2.7, in solar conjunction. Look for a 1.5' coma. It should fade rapidly, moving into Aquila by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Very low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~06:00 Not visible Not visible Not visible 3-26
40o N Very low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~06:10 Very low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:40 Very low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:30 Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:20 Not visible 3-
Equator Not visible Very low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:20 Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:10 Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 6-
30o S Not visible Not visible Not visible Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:30 Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:40 13-

C/2019 U5 (PANSTARRS): A morning comet visible in a 10-inch (25 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Virgo at magnitude 12.5. Look for a 2' coma. It should brighten slowly.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:50 Fairly high in the eastern sky at ~00:40 Fairly high at ~03:20 Fairly high at ~02:40 Fairly high in the western sky during morning twilight at ~04:50 1-
40o N High during morning twilight at ~05:50 Fairly high in the eastern sky at ~23:50 High at ~03:20 High at ~02:40 Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:10 1-
Equator High during morning twilight at ~05:10 Fairly high in the eastern sky in moonlight at ~23:20 High at ~03:20 High at ~02:40 High at ~04:30 1-
30o S High during morning twilight at ~04:20 Fairly high in moonlight at ~00:40 High at ~03:20 High at ~02:40 High at ~03:40 1-

C/2020 K1 (PANSTARRS): A southern hemisphere morning comet visible in a 12.5-inch (32 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Sagittarius at magnitude 13.1. Look for a 55" coma. It should brighten slowly. The best visibility is late in the month as seen from the southern hemisphere.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
Equator Not visible Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:10 Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 1-
30o S Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:20 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:20 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:20 Fairly high at ~04:30 Fairly high at ~04:30 1-

C/2022 U2 (ATLAS): An evening comet visible in a 14-inch (36 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Perseus at magnitude 11.3. Look for a 4' coma. It should fade rapidly, moving into Orion by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N High during evening twilight at ~18:30 High at ~19:50 High at ~19:50 High in moonlight at ~20:00 Not visible 1-26
40o N High during evening twilight at ~18:40 High at ~19:50 High at ~19:40 High in moonlight at ~22:10 Not visible 1-27
Equator High during evening twilight at ~19:20 High at ~19:50 High at ~19:50 High at ~22:20 Not visible 1-27
30o S Not visible Fairly high in the northern sky at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~21:10 Not visible 3-27

C/2021 Y1 (ATLAS): An evening comet visible in a 16-inch (41 cm) telescope
This comet begins the month in Eridanus at magnitude 14.0. Look for a 50" coma. It should remain constant.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Fairly high in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~18:40 Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:00 Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:00 Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:10 Not visible 1-
40o N Fairly high during evening twilight at ~18:50 Fairly high at ~19:00 Fairly high during evening twilight at ~19:10 Fairly high in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:10 Fairly high in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:10 1-
Equator High during evening twilight at ~19:20 High at ~19:30 High at ~19:30 High in moonlight at ~19:30 High during evening twilight at ~19:20 1-
30o S High during evening twilight at ~20:10 High during evening twilight at ~20:20 High during evening twilight at ~20:10 High during evening twilight at ~20:00 High during evening twilight at ~19:40 1-

C/2019 T4 (ATLAS): A morning comet visible in very large telescopes
This comet begins the month in Serpens Caput at magnitude 13.1. Look for a 2' coma. It should remain constant.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:50 Fairly high during morning twilight at ~05:30 Fairly high at ~05:00 High at ~04:40 High during morning twilight at ~05:00 1-
40o N High during morning twilight at ~05:40 High in moonlight at ~05:30 High at ~05:10 High at ~05:00 High during morning twilight at ~05:10 1-
Equator High during morning twilight at ~05:10 High in moonlight at ~05:00 High at ~04:50 High at ~04:50 High at ~04:40 1-
30o S High during morning twilight at ~04:20 High in moonlight at ~04:10 High at ~04:10 High at ~04:20 High at ~04:20 1-

C/2022 S3 (PANSTARRS): A southern hemisphere evening comet visible in very large telescopes
This comet begins the month in Tucana at magnitude 13.7. Look for a 4' coma. It should brighten slowly, moving into Dorado by month's end. The best visibility is late in the month as seen from the southern hemisphere.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
Equator Not visible Not visible Low in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~19:30 Fairly high in the southern sky in moonlight at ~19:30 Not visible 13-
30o S Fairly high in the southern sky during evening twilight at ~20:20 Fairly high at ~20:20 High at ~20:10 High in moonlight at ~20:10 Not visible 1-

C/2022 P1 (NEOWISE): A southern hemisphere morning comet visible in very large telescopes
This comet begins the month in Sagittarius at magnitude 12.9. Look for a 2' coma. It should fade by about 1.2 magnitudes, moving into Corona Australis by month's end. The best visibility is mid-month as seen from the southern hemisphere.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
Equator Not visible Not visible Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~05:00 Fairly high in the eastern sky at ~05:00 Not visible 13-
30o S Low in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:10 Fairly high in the eastern sky during morning twilight at ~04:20 Fairly high in the eastern sky at ~04:20 Fairly high at ~04:20 High at ~04:30 1-5, 8-

73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann: An evening comet visible in very large telescopes
This comet begins the month in Pisces at magnitude 14.5. Look for a 45" coma. It should fade by about 0.7 magnitudes, moving into Cetus by month's end.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~18:50 Not visible Not visible Not visible 7-12
40o N Not visible Fairly high in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:00 Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:10 Not visible Not visible 1-2, 6-21
Equator Not visible Fairly high in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:30 Fairly high in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:30 Not visible Not visible 1-2, 5-24
30o S Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible 6-9

C/2021 T4 (Lemmon): An evening comet visible in very large telescopes
This comet begins the month in Cetus at magnitude 15.1. Look for a 35" coma. It should brighten slowly.  FINDER CHART

Latitude Visibility February 4 Visibility February 11 Visibility February 18 Visibility February 25 Visibility March 4 Nights Visible
55o N Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible Not visible  
40o N Not visible Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~18:50 Not visible Not visible Not visible 6-11
Equator Not visible Fairly high in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:30 Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~19:20 Not visible Not visible 1-2, 5-21
30o S Not visible Low in the western sky during evening twilight at ~20:10 Not visible Not visible Not visible 1-1, 5-13, 15-15

Summary Data for This Month's Telescopic Comets


Comets brighter than 16th magnitude.  This table is updated as necessary. The last column indicates the date of the last observation used to compute these values.  The constellation listed is where the comet was on the first of the month.
Comet Constellation

February 1st

February 15th

February 28th

Observations as of (UT)
Mag Diam Mag Diam Mag Diam
96P/Machholz* Aquarius 2.7 2.3' 9.9 1.7' 12.2 1.4' 2023 January 21
C/2022 E3 (ZTF) Camelopardalis 5.1 20.2' 6.7 11.0' 8.2 6.3' 2023 February 1
C/2017 K2 (PANSTARRS) Indus 8.2 4.6' 8.3 4.6' 8.4 4.5' 2022 December 26
C/2022 A2 (PANSTARRS) Draco 9.5 4.3' 9.6 3.9' 9.8 3.6' 2023 January 1
C/2020 V2 (ZTF) Cassiopeia 9.9 2.1' 10.0 2.0' 10.1 1.8' 2023 January 31
C/2022 U2 (ATLAS) Perseus 11.3 4.1' 12.1 3.5' 13.1 2.8' 2023 January 24
29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann Auriga 11.4 2.0' 11.5 1.9' 11.6 1.8' 2023 January 1
C/2019 L3 (ATLAS) Antlia 11.5 1.1' 11.5 1.1' 11.6 1.1' 2023 January 14
81P/Wild Libra 11.8 1.5' 11.9 1.6' 12.1 1.6' 2023 January 31
C/2019 U5 (PANSTARRS) Virgo 12.5 1.7' 12.3 1.8' 12.2 1.9' 2023 January 31
C/2022 P1 (NEOWISE) Sagittarius 12.9 1.9' 13.5 1.9' 14.1 2.1' 2022 December 15
C/2019 T4 (ATLAS) Serpens Caput 13.1 1.7' 13.1 1.7' 13.1 1.8' 2022 December 28
C/2020 K1 (PANSTARRS) Sagittarius 13.1? 52"? 13.0? 54"? 12.9? 57"? 2022 November 12
118P/Shoemaker-Levy Cancer 13.4 1.5' 13.6 1.4' 13.9 1.2' 2023 January 31
C/2022 S3 (PANSTARRS) Tucana 13.7? 2.6'? 13.6? 3.3'? 13.6? 4.3'? 2022 November 9
C/2021 Y1 (ATLAS) Eridanus 14.0 54" 14.0 50" 14.0 48" 2023 January 21
73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann Cetus 14.5 46" 14.9 42" 15.2 39" 2023 January 14
119P/Parker-Hartley Gemini 14.7 1.6' 15.0 1.5' 15.3 1.3' 2023 January 31
C/2021 T4 (Lemmon) Cetus 15.1 33" 15.0 33" 14.8 33" 2023 January 13
C/2021 X1 (Maury-Attard) Eridanus 15.2 41" 15.3 39" 15.4 37" 2023 January 17
C/2021 S3 (PANSTARRS) Columba 15.3 31" 15.2 31" 15.1 31" 2023 January 28
C/2020 S4 (PANSTARRS) Leo 15.5 1.1' 15.5 1.1' 15.6 1.0' 2022 December 31
117P/Helin-Roman-Alu Capricornus 15.5 25" 15.6 25" 15.7 25" 2022 November 23
C/2021 G2 (Atlas) Vela 15.6 32" 15.6 32" 15.5 33" 2023 January 14
C/2020 Y2 (ATLAS) Fornax 15.8 29" 16.0 27" 16.2 26" 2022 December 26
C/2021 E3 (ZTF) Puppis 15.9 1.2' 16.3 1.1' 16.8 1.1' 2022 November 5
C/2022 E2 (ATLAS) Hydra 16.0 33" 15.9 34" 15.8 35" 2023 January 25
77P/Longmore Virgo 16.1 52" 15.9 57" 15.7 1.0' 2023 January 27
*In solar conjunction and generally not visible

For information about specific comets see Gary W. Kronk's Cometography 

Further reading: see Comet Chasing, Sky & Telescope, April 2005, pg. 83.

Make your own visual observing custom charts for your location and telescope/binoculars: software for visual comet observing 

Select comets that are appropriate for your imaging system, and plan when they are best imaged: software for comet imaging 
 

Links

Skyhound's Guide to Comets
Skyhound's Guide to Finding Comets
BAA Comet Section
Weekly Information About Bright Comets
Cometography